Nailing It 28: Jody Wilward - Stephanie Campanella

Nailing It 28: Jody Wilward

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Stephanie Campanella
October 31st 2019

Stephanie C.:
Well, hello nailers, and welcome back to another action packed episode of Nailing It with Steph Campanella. That’s me. Today, we have Jody.

Jody Milward:
Hello.

Stephanie C.:
So Jody Milward, right?

Jody Milward:
That’s it.

Stephanie C.:
I get so nervous when I get to the surname part.

Jody Milward:
I just get nervous at the first name part so you’re doing better than me. Right?

Stephanie C.:
All right. For those of you that don’t know Jody, Jody, do you want to fill in the listeners as to who in the hell you are and what the hell you do?

Jody Milward:
Oh, my gosh. That is a great question. Anyway, my name’s Jody. Hi guys. I used to be a private investigator but turned Facebook ad and funnel strategist. So I particularly specialize in Facebook ads and funnels for high ticket coaches, and we train and recruit ad managers to partner with a high ticket coach, or we’re training coaches who are not yet at that stage where they can hire an agency or a freelancer, they’re bootstrapping, they’ve got to learn the ropes themselves. So we train them up so that they get the right systems in play, get results, can scale. And then we can partner them up with the perfect ad manager for them.

Stephanie C.:
Holy cow.

Jody Milward:
I know, right?

Stephanie C.:
That was perfect.

Jody Milward:
I’m trying, I’ll snip that, and I’ll listen to that lots of times because I’ve needed to try and get that perfect for a long time.

Stephanie C.:
That’s good. I’ll send you that one back.

Jody Milward:
Okay.

Stephanie C.:
First things first, for all the listeners, Jody has mentioned High Ticket Sales Coaches. Right? So you have a niche.

Jody Milward:
I do, big time, and that was really diving into it as well. Not just any sort of course creator, not just a digital program, not just any sort of coach, but diving into the High Ticket Coaching niche.

Stephanie C.:
For those that don’t know that coaching area, what’s a high ticket coach? What does that mean?

Jody Milward:
Okay. So traditionally or typically these days, you’re talking about people who are selling a group coaching program, three months, $5,000 or more for that. So we have ones that are 3,000. The lowest would be a $3,000 mark. Okay? So generally things that require to get people on the phone for a sales call, to get them to close. Not so much, oh, yeah, here’s the $7 info product, although we do have them in these funnels, but it’s an essential part that if you do have them then that’s more of a self-liquidating offer. You’ve got these smaller ones as lead gen and then the ultimate thing is you’re getting them into your $5,000, $10,000 program, whether that’s a three month or 12 month, and then a mastermind as well.

Stephanie C:
Right. Okay. So it’s all those Facebook ads that the marketers all be seeing and they’re like, Oh, should I jump onto that Coach?

Jody Milward:
I’ve got to watch that webinar now. Right.

Stephanie C:
Awesome. So you said that, yeah, I mean, I’ve gone all in with this coaching. Was there a moment in your business before that you doing a whole bunch of stuff and then you-

Jody Milward:
Yes.

Stephanie C.:
Yeah? Tell me about that.

Jody Milward:
It was a nightmare. Before I really niched in, I was just freelancing and I was doing stuff on Upwork, right? Who knows Upwork, where you go to get your digital people? I was just freelancing on there. I had a real estate, and I just hated the real estate stuff and just all these different stuff. It’s just a mishmash. Then I went in-house and worked for a company. It was an info product, it was a $500 in information by product, and we made $1 million in nine months with that, and then the two and a half million in 18 months. That was in the heyday, right? 2015, 2016.

And then I’ve burned out from that, then I went to scale up, an agency, right? Because it was like, I can’t do all this by myself anymore. Do an agency. I was talking to a friend who did stuff for orthodontists and a few brick and mortars. I’m like, “How many hours a week do you do with the orthodontist stuff?” And she went, “Oh, about a month.” How many hours a month then? “Oh, about six hours.” I’m what? I do 60 hours a week with this one coaching client. So it was tough. I was like, “Right. Okay. Well, I’m in the wrong niche.” So after I burned out and it was like, okay, I need to get more work again, I delivered, probably a silly idea, but chocolates to dentists and orthodontists. Sweeten them up and get them on board. No one was interested because they didn’t appreciate the value of Facebook ads like I had seen.

So it was like I was in the wrong niche. And then I was trying to build up the agency, doing what we would call an un-niched funnel where your ads are just out there and you get all sorts of stuff, and that was a nightmare. I had someone ringing up to do events, had someone else wanting to do stuff for their computer shop, had all this random stuff, and it was just like, I can’t do this. Me and my brain, I really need focus. I cannot spread myself thin across multiple things. So I just went back to what I know and I was like, “All right, I know how to do ads to a webinar or for an info product, all the webinar ads and all the targeting, and all those bits and pieces, all the integrations and software that goes with it. That’s what I know, so that’s what I need to dive into.”

And then from there, again, like we were just saying, you can have all different areas of that. You can have your digital products, you can have coaches that are just … or people who are looking for consultants. Okay? Like a financial planner just wanting lead gen. There’s all sort of different areas of it, but it was like, well, no, I’m specializing in these high ticket coaches again. And I think that’s the importance of it now, is like, while I had my services done for you sort of services. And then also with products and training, it was like, okay, where is that blue ocean? Because seriously, it’s a red ocean out there with Facebook ad manages and ad programs and trainings. It’s like, how am I going to differentiate from this? How am I going to be different to the next guy who’s selling an ad program?

So that’s where I would just say, “Okay. Well, this is my expertise. This is who I’ve actually worked with.” And yes, it is a bit of a scary thing going, “Oh, man, should I just dive now in this little section of this?” But that’s where it’s been most rewarding because I’m therefore attracting those people who go, “Oh, my gosh, yes, that’s what I need. I’m a high ticket coach. All these other people are teaching this how to do whatever and it doesn’t apply.” So focusing in on that high ticket coaching niche and actually saying it in everything that I do is actually bringing the right ideal client to me rather than just this big broad audience, and then I’ve got to try and nitpick them out.

Stephanie C.:
You have crossed so many sections there.

Jody Milward:
I answered all the questions in one.

Stephanie C.:
From a previous episode. Just recently we talked about turning lead generation on your head, and we made up the dental dominator because if people wanted to be in the dentist niche, then we just called it the dental dominator and then told them to go out there and go get it. It’s so funny what you’re saying. You attempted to go for that dental, orthodontic space, and you sent them chocolates, and then you just got crickets, and you’re beating your head like, “Oh, man, what have I done? I tried to do something and I failed.” So first, you got that whole failure thing, but then you’ve completely overcome it, and you’ve gone back in. If you have picked a niche and it was no good, you’re not married to the niche.

Jody Milward:
No. That’s exactly right. You still learn along the way, right? And you’ll learn things that you can implement into something else.

Stephanie C.:
So you went back and you picked again.

Jody Milward:
Yeah, exactly. Dialed in further, I guess. Yeah.

Stephanie C.:
The other thing that you mentioned was that they didn’t understand or know the value of Facebook ads.

Jody Milward:
Yeah. That’s what I found with a lot of the brick mortars, and not only going to orthodontists and the dentist. When I was doing that, I was looking at okay, rather than going to stores that have a low cost average order value or whatever it is. That’s my language.

But it’s like, okay, so it was also cosmetic surgeons, pool builders, those ones with higher ticket offers, I’m going to sort all those guys. But while some of them would be advertising on Google, that was still a leap forward with them, and they’d all be saying, “Oh, no, our audience isn’t on Facebook.” But, yes, they are. They’re hanging out there with their friends and family, and seeing what their nieces and nephews are doing. So just calling and reaching out to those guys, it was cold calling. Right? It was hell, this is this seriously hell. So doing that, you would just meet the gatekeepers and you’d just get shunned. Right? No one was interested. They didn’t want to know. You were just after them to get their money. But they just didn’t realize, it’s like, how much are you paying for someone to book a call with you or get someone out to give you a quote with the newspaper? Can you track that at all? Do you know what that’s actually costing you?

“Yeah, we can get leads. It might be 100 bucks but …” To start with, once we get the data through, we can see. But how much are you going to make on the end of that? Right? So they just saw you as someone … And seriously, because they get calls all the time, right? They’re always getting people that ring and harassing them they say. There’s starting to be a bit more of an awareness but for a lot of local businesses that I spoke to at the time, they just didn’t understand Facebook ads or understand how they could make money with it.

Stephanie C.:
And for the audience’s knowledge, the customers didn’t understand Facebook ads and stuff, right? How long ago was this?

Jody Milward:
That would’ve been probably in 2017.

Stephanie C.:
Okay, so two years ago, give or take.

Jody Milward:
Yeah, end of 2017.

Stephanie C.:
Okay. Okay. Interesting. The key thing, the story that you’re telling here is about clients in motion, and you’re also talking about going from an unwanted pest to a welcomed guest.

Jody Milward:
That’s exactly right. Exactly.

Stephanie C.:
I got there.

Jody Milward:
You got there. That’s a great saying. I love that.

Stephanie C.:
You’ve tried the cold calling piece.

Jody Milward:
Oh, it was hell, it was bad times.

Jody Milward:
Good luck to anyone that cold calls.

Stephanie C.:
I was told by a good friend, Brent Weaver, that when your mother calls, that’s a cold call. And I’m like, “Well, that’s an interesting way to look at it.” Then cold calling doesn’t seem that bad. Right? But, oh, yeah, I think that that is a tough slog.

Jody Milward:
It was, yeah, it really was. And I hit absolute rock bottom because I burned out. So it was like I just needed to do some easy lead gen work and whatever. I was doing my own lead gen campaign so like I said, I’d get ones through. And that’s really hard, right? When they don’t know who you are and it’s just like, show me some testimonials, case studies and all the rest of it. And then they didn’t have the ad budgets that were really needed, they were just starting out. So I was just rock bottom, trying to do the cold calling, hit the pavement, C businesses and get business. It got to this stage, honestly, it was coming up to Christmas so it would’ve been coming up to Christmas, I think 2017. I don’t think it was 2016. It was like I had no money. Seriously. Our income had gone from whatever and it had gone down to a third. Savings were gone, everything was gone. It was like, holy crap, what am I going to do now?

I was talking to a very trusted friend who was a great mentor and I was going, “Look, I’m hearing about these factory jobs, $20 an hour. So I’m thinking maybe I’ll just do that and give up.” I’d spend $50,000 on my Facebook ad education by that stage. Right?

Stephanie C.:
Wow.

Jody Milward:
So he’s going, “Well, Jody, if that’s what it takes to keep the lights on, well, then maybe you should just go do it.” I went, “Oh, crap, wasn’t good answer.” So then I thought, “Right. Well, if I’m going to defy him and go, I’m not going to do it, I better make it work.” Because I knew if I were to go off and do this factory job, I would just seriously die on the inside. And I can feel it now. So I was like, “Right, I’ve just got to buckle in.” That’s where I just focused back on getting back into the coaching niche, and just with some connections that I had, I competed against some other significant players, like people who would run ads for T. Harv Eker and other big people, and I won an ad account.

Jody Milward:
So that got us off and running. Okay? That was a major pivot and a turnaround, and from there with those successes, it was like, yep, this is our niche, and we just dialed in. I went from seriously being burned out with nothing to therefore going and making multiple six figures the following year and such, and onwards and upwards. So that was the importance of focusing in for me, focusing in for that niche, and then just really committing to it.

Stephanie C.:
Wow. I mean, what a story to go from what sounds like rock bottom.

Jody Milward:
Seriously. It was bad times.
Who’s going to get Christmas presents. Right? So it was like …

Stephanie C.:
Yeah, wow. So going from absolute rock bottom to just going all in on your niche, and taking that risk.

Jody Milward:
Yep. Exactly. It has been, and when I’ve talked to people and said, “Yep. Facebook ads, high ticket coaches.” “Wow, that’s really niched.” “Yeah, it is.”

Stephanie C.:
Do you find that people like, “Oh, that’s too niched?” Do people say that to you?

Jody Milward:
I haven’t got that yet, actually.

Stephanie C.:
That’s excellent.

Jody Milward:
It is.

Stephanie C.:
Funny, the things that people say you are only the measurement of their own ability or success.

Jody Milward:
So true. Yep. So true.

Stephanie C.:
Interesting. That’s amazing. You’ve seriously gone from typical … And I mean, the guys that listen to this, they’re freelancers, they’re agency owners, they’re marketers, designers. They’re just trying to get runs on the board and trying to have some success, and they’re shy about niching. But your story is incredible.

Jody Milward:
One of the books that I read recently that’s really helped me focus even more was Built to Scale. Are you familiar with that one?

Stephanie C.:
I know the book, but I haven’t actually read it.

Jody Milward:
I’m just … Sorry, excuse my back.

Stephanie C.:
Oh, how dare you, Jody?

Jody Milward:
I was like, “No, I have it here. I can just show it to you.”

Stephanie C.:
To scale.

Jody Milward:
No, I can’t find it.

Stephanie C.:
The title rings a bell.

Jody Milward:
Yeah. What’s the guy’s name? Anyway, can’t find it. So that was really good because what he was talking about, and this is like you were saying, freelancers, agency owners. This guy had his little agency, it was done like a story. A man had his agency and wanted to sell it, and it wasn’t really with anything because he was the one doing all the work. So if he left, then all those client relationships, everything like that would just fall apart. So he was talking about a story over a couple of years where he put it in systems to get himself out of the business. It all came down to what is the one thing or the one thing that you do that is the most profitable, that you can systematize? So from there, that’s how the whole story goes that he did that, put a [inaudible 00:16:10], everyone took over these roles and then that was it. This company in the book was known for creating logos and they would charge $10,000 for logo. Doesn’t that sound awesome?

So reading that book really, again, helped me to solidify like, okay, get the systems and the processes together. What is that framework or the systems that you have that sets you apart for thus high ticket coaching niche? And focusing and dialing on that so that it is systematized and it can be run through while, admittedly, when you’re doing ads and whatever, it’s not all cookie cutter, right? There are different ways to get people in, however it does basically come back to certain frameworks. It’s the messaging for each niche, like if you’re talking to a health coach or if you’re a high ticket coach and you’re selling to consumers rather than business to business, then it’s going to be slightly different. But it all still follows a particular framework. So that book, it really helped me to just solidify, okay, here’s a system and a process, and this is what we are known for.

Stephanie C.:
Wow. Okay. Awesome. Built to Scale, I’ll make sure I drop that one in the chat, in the show notes I should say say.

Sweet. Again, obstacles, was there anything else that was pulling you towards this coaching? How did you decide that coaching … And you knew that that was it. Could you tell the listeners about that?

Jody Milward:
Yeah. Look, it’s really strange because these coaching niches can be tough, right? It’s not just a matter of an E-comm product where it’s like you go, “Here, this is my lip balm,” and everyone can see it and go, “Oh, wow, I want that.” You really need to be plugging into the psychological aspects of what’s their pain point, what do they want to resolve, and taking them along a customer journey, and building trust and all the rest of it. And then even doing a webinar. Does this sentence at the end effect the whole conversion numbers? So I guess for me, with being really data and analytical, that’s where I really like to strategize and plan everything out so I can go, “Okay, look, this is where the bottleneck is,” and knowing what the numbers are. So I found … I don’t know, I lost my train of thought there completely with where the question was. I was just going off.

But I think my private investigator background as well, of just getting into the nitty gritty, I think that’s where this has really helped with this kind of niche as well. Help identify where the bottlenecks are and what they need to consider, and all the intricate pieces. Seriously, I do, I enjoy when people talk about Zapier or those who know about Zapier. It’s like, oh, you can create a link here and a link there, and it’ll zap there, and it’ll do this, and getting into all those automations. I really love that.

Stephanie C.:
Wow. Okay. The question was about why coaches and getting into that. But no, you did answer, yes. But I mean a little like me, I tend to just talk a lot.

Jody Milward:
It’s not a bad thing.

Stephanie C.:
It’s not a bad thing. No. We keep the other guys entertained.

Jody Milward:
That’s right.

Stephanie C.:
You talk about the before and the after state in marketing, and we’ve talked a lot about your before and where you’re at, and rock bottom and struggles, and that kind of stuff. Where are you at now? Have you gone from Flat to Flourishing.

Jody Milward:
I think the flourishing is good. I’ve had some challenges with team members, not having the right team members on board. So now in a great place with great team members on board, so that is excellent. One of the things was an operations person, right? So that while I can do all the tech and the zaps and build the funnels and all the rest of it, that as a business owner now is not where my time is best spent. For me, my time is best spent actually doing research and looking at what’s working now, and learning, and continue, and then sharing that with creating content. Therefore, I can get the ideas and the strategies, and I can go to my team and say, “Right, this is what I want right now.” I also have the knowledge to go, “We’re going to need a tag here, an automation, an email sequence and …”

So I know how it’s all going to go lay out, but I don’t have to spend six hours going off and doing it. You’ve got to think of when you have things on board that you’ve said yes to, what have you actually said no to. So when you’re doing things that just aren’t the right fit for you, and I had a few things going on. I would do a lot of coaching for other programs as well. I was a Facebook ad coach for Cat Howell and Scott Olkwood. That took a lot of time, right? So there I was, while I was wanting to get my own things up and running … And it was great experience. I’m so thankful for all of it, but I was there contributing to other people’s programs instead of doing my own thing.

So when I actually look at that and think, what was the opportunity costs to me saying yes to these others and therefore saying no to myself and my own business? What has that actually cost me? And then it didn’t give me space to go off and do my own thing. So now I know more and a couple of other things as well. Now that I have that space and that focus that, yes, I really do feel like I am flourishing, I’ve got the team on board, I can focus on what I’m creating and what I’m doing, my own program, connecting with my community and getting my information out. So yes, definitely in a state of flourishing. I mean there’s a lot more to go. We’ve got a lot more operating procedures. We’re in a bit of a whitewash phase now as well, where I’m trying to get all the Q4 plans together, saying, “Right team, this is where we’re going over the next three months and here’s the heads up for the three months after.”

We’re in a bit of a whitewash phase because just released a program and it’s like, all the systems up and running, and I want to get all these things done at once that I’ve been wanting to do for so long, and only have this space. So now it’s that thing of, okay, let’s plan it out and go. But yes. Short answer, yes. Flourishing. I love that.

Stephanie C.:
You mentioned an operations manager. I call that a J-L-B, a Junior Lady Boss who’s like your lady boss. And then you need a junior lady boss.

Jody Milward:
Well, yeah that’s good. But he’s like a little Iranian and he’s this tall. He’s over in England.

Stephanie C.:
Oh, wow.

Jody Milward:
He’s awesome. He is the best. He has made my life so, so much better. So yeah, he is an ops boss.

Stephanie C.:
Do you really connect with the fact that you niched, you did one thing, you’re solving one solution? Then you had enough clarity to go, “I need this person to help me in my business.”

Jody Milward:
Yeah, absolutely, because I can get so caught up with doing all the funnels and the integrations, and I just feel like that busy, you’re just doing that busy kind of stuff, whereas if you’re the business owner … There’s a Dennis Yu who is a big Facebook marketer, and I remember seeing him, and he said if you’re a business owner, that you should be spending four hours a day networking, four hours a day doing research and learning, and another hour doing whatever. Okay, a nine hours day. So the main thing was that you need to be getting out there, being visible, creating content, making connections with people. And seriously, that has been a big opportunity for me is that connecting with people. And again, I think that leads to when you do focus in on your niche, then you will attract and be hanging around with those people who compliment that niche, therefore make those connections and ideally be able to build some business relationships.

Stephanie C.:
Wow. So many lessons there again, just about niching, going all in, focus, clarity in motion, like a system. It’s all the bits and pieces that have really driven your success.

Jody Milward:
Yeah. It has.

Stephanie C.:
I’ve got a bit of a funny one. Tell me about how you can spend 100 bucks in ads and make 20 bucks back.

Jody Milward:
20? Oh, you can easily do that, yeah, $120, but there’s the ones that are saying they’ve spent $100 in ads and make $200,000 back. They’re the ones you really got to watch. Okay? They’re the ones everyone loves to brag about. That’s what you’ll see and that’s what you’ll hear. And you go, “Oh, crap. I can never get those results with my Facebook ads.”

Stephanie C.:
It’s impossible.

Jody Milward:
Well, it’s not impossible, but generally it happens because the people that are doing it like an influencer or they’re a brand, and they’ve had stuff going for a long time. They’ve got books out there. Okay? And then they’ve got this audience that they’d been building and curating for years, that if you just run some retargeting campaigns to those warm audiences, you’ll get those sales. Right? So that’s just something to keep in mind as people because very easily can spend $100 to make 20. Happens all the time and happens to most of us.

Jody Milward:
But just keep in mind that you’re normal. Okay? You’ll like that. So you’ll hear these great stories with these great influences, or established brands and these fantastic results they get. It’s taken a long time to get there. So when you’re doing Facebook ads these days, if you’re just starting out, you’re pushing a log up a hill.

You need to be building brand awareness, creating an audience. Yes, you still can get automated sales. I had one come through today. It was someone who just came onto my list, watched an email and bang, they purchased. So it still happens, but it’s that very small 1%. You need to be building up that audience know, like, and trust. And especially for a high ticket coaching niche, getting people to get on a sales call with you. One, if they don’t know you, then you’ve got a good chance that you’re going to be ghosted, right? They’re not even going to turn up for the call. And then when you ring them up they go, “Oh, who are you? Oh, I can’t even remember booking that call.”

Stephanie C.:
Yeah, wow.

Jody Milward:
And all those kinds of things. So by investing into the relationship, being present in the newsfeed, building up those audiences so that it’ll be three months, six months, even 12 months time. The number of coaches that I talk to that will say, “Oh, yeah, I talked to someone today, they’d been following me for eight months.” You need to be nurturing those relationships, you’re playing for the long game. I mean when I joined Mastermind a couple of years ago, it was $1,000 a month US membership. I knew who the person was, been reading all about them, and they just saying, “Yeah, yeah, no questions. Here you go.” And it’s like, wouldn’t that be so good if your sales calls are pretty much all like that? that’s where investing into that relationship so that yes, you may get to a stage where you’ll be able to spend $100 and make $20,000 back. Okay? But it’s going to take a while to get there.

Stephanie C.:
Yeah, right. They’re not telling you that the kettle’s already been boiled.

Jody Milward:
Exactly. Love. I’m going to take that.

Stephanie C.:
You can take it, put that in your pocket.

Jody Milward:
Awesome, love that.

Stephanie C.:
The kettle’s being boiled. All you got to do is pour the cup of tea.

Jody Milward:
That sounds like such an Australian kind of saying. Doesn’t it?

Stephanie C.:
Kettle’s on, love.

Jody Milward:
Because I deal with Americans mostly, 98%, and I would say, “I went in this ad account and it looked like dog’s breakfast.” And they’re just going, “Dog’s breakfast?” I thought it was the funniest thing ever.

Stephanie C.:
We don’t always say Crikey, and what’s the other one? Thing on the barbie?

Jody Milward:
A shrimp on the barbie. Yeah. I had someone say that to me the other day.

Stephanie C.:
Oh, God, yuck. I like dog’s breakfast. That’s a good one. All right. I got caught in the dog’s breakfast.

Jody Milward:
Has that kind of effect.

Stephanie C.:
For those that want to start following you and getting to know you a bit better, and just start to idolize how you’ve just gone from flat to flourishing, where’s the best place for them to hang out with you?

Jody Milward:
Okay. Well naturally, I’m a Facebook person, so I have a Facebook group funnily enough. You can get there by going to jodymilward.com/group. That’s https://jodymilward.com/group.

Stephanie C.:
Sweet. Awesome. I will make sure that is in the show notes.

Jody Milward:
Okay.

Stephanie C.:
A sneaky last question. You just mentioned this Facebook thing, right?

Jody Milward:
Yes.

Stephanie C.:
Are you all in on Facebook or do you like Instagram? Snapchat? Pinterest?

Jody Milward:
Yeah. Look, I’ve got a … No, Snapchat, no, no. I tried that a couple of years ago, didn’t get into it. Because I basically put my time where my ideal clients are, right? So Facebook is predominantly number one. The Instagram, I still get a bit lost in. I can set up the ads and the ads will go good over here in the news because that’s all set up in ads manager with Facebook and everything. So that’s all fine. I am going to up my stories game and get into all of that. So for me, Instagram and LinkedIn are the next two that I’m really diving into.

Stephanie C.:
Okay. But you’ve really, again, you went all in on your niche and you went all in on your platform too.

Jody Milward:
Yeah, I did. Now with that though, and that’s where it’s like, yeah, I really need to diversify. And while I do that, I do have a system where I do one video and then that gets repurposed onto all of the platforms. So there is that diversification, but it is very risky to just dial in. So while I have focused on Facebook and I have been building everything over there, it is a dangerous thing because as we know, a few months ago when Facebook broke and it was a world apocalypse, I had people that have all their paid groups over in the Facebook group and the people can’t access them. So that’s why for one reason, I will have my paid groups over in Slack generally so we can still communicate with Facebook breaks.

So it is a risky thing. But yes, I have dialed in there, and then that’s why I have taught because there’s so much going on with Facebook all the time. And again, like I said, I can’t spread myself too thin. I really do like to focus only in one area, which again was Facebook. So yeah, that’s basically what I teach about.

Stephanie C.:
Awesome. You’ve just put a massive light bulb in my head about this. The Slack versus Facebook groups. I mean, I’m getting ready to launch a course and literally as you do, you put the Facebook group together. It should be a Slack channel.

Jody Milward:
Yeah. I’ve just released a course and I did actually put that over as a Facebook group because there’s only so much volume that you can have in Slack before you start paying for it. Right? So I’ve got other paid higher ticket programs over in Slack where we’re managing it there. But for this group, which a … I say lower ticket with $1,000. That’s where people can come in, and that’s going to be completely scalable. So I can see there could be 3,000, 5,000 people in there. That’s why I chose a Facebook group there. Hopefully, it doesn’t come back to bite me. But yeah, Slack is good. I really like that as well, that you can really streamline and you’ve got all your channels because again, that’s with the groups. They can just go, “Where was that?” I know someone posted about this.

Stephanie C.:
Oh, a nightmare. Right?

Stephanie C.:
I was going to say I’m the worst at, “Make sure you tag the post.” And I’m like, “I don’t know how to tag the post. I’m just going to type because that’s how I type on text.” Oh, sweet. Well, it’s been awesome having you.

Jody Milward:
It’s been a ton of fun.

Stephanie C.:
Thank you so much. Listeners, a round of applause. Thank you very much.

Lady boss Jody over here’s killing it with the high ticket coaches.

Jody Milward:
The ones, they’re the ones.

Stephanie C.:
It is really nice to hear success in niching and it’s really nice to share your story.

Jody Milward:
Why, thank you. It’s been so much fun. Thanks for having me on, Stephanie. It’s been fun.

Stephanie C.:
All right, legend. Well, I thank you so much. Until next time, ciao.

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